state laws at your finger tips
in concise, plain language
Legislation watch

Search all years.

2008 Special Session House Bill 1: Slightly lower public employee fringe benefits
Introduced by Rep. Mike Cherry (D) on June 23, 2008 To change public employee benefits for new government employees hired on or after September 1, 2008. The bill extends various requirements for employees to get pension, health, and leave benefits and limits the availability of others, but does not do so enough to reverse the growth of an actuarial deficit that is currently in excess of $27 billion.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House State Government Committee on June 23, 2008
Reported in the House on June 23, 2008 Favorably, 1st reading, to Calendar.
Referred to the House Rules Committee on June 24, 2008
Passed 98 to 0 in the House on June 25, 2008.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
(same description)
To change public employee benefits for new government employees hired on or after September 1, 2008. The bill extends various requirements for employees to get pension, health, and leave benefits and limits the availability of others, but does not do so enough to reverse the growth of an actuarial deficit that is currently in excess of $27 billion.
Received in the Senate on June 25, 2008
Referred to the Senate State and Local Government Committee on June 25, 2008
Referred to the Senate Rules Committee on June 27, 2008
Passed 35 to 1 in the Senate on June 27, 2008.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
(same description)
To change public employee benefits for new government employees hired on or after September 1, 2008. The bill extends various requirements for employees to get pension, health, and leave benefits and limits the availability of others, but does not do so enough to reverse the growth of an actuarial deficit that is currently in excess of $27 billion.
Signed by Gov. Steve Beshear on June 27, 2008 To change public employee benefits for new government employees hired on or after September 1, 2008. The bill extends various requirements for employees to get pension, health, and leave benefits and limits the availability of others, but does not do so enough to reverse the growth of an actuarial deficit that is currently in excess of $27 billion.

Comments